Vince Carter Bio, Age, Career Stats, Retire

Vince Carter born as Vincent Lamar Carter is an American professional basketball player for the Atlanta Hawks of the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Vince Carter Biography

Vince Carter born as Vincent Lamar Carter on January 26, 1977 , in Daytona Beach, Florida U.S. He is an American professional basketball player for the Atlanta Hawks of the National Basketball Association (NBA).

He is 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m) tall and plays both shooting guard and small forward.
He is the fourth player in the NBA ever to play 21 seasons, the most in NBA history. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest dunkers of all-time.

Vince Carter Age

He was born on  January 26, 1977. He is 42 years old as at 2019.

Vince Carter Height

He stands at aheght of 1.98 m.

Vince Carter Wingspan

He has a wingspan of 2.11 m.

Vince Carter Image

Vince Carter Family

He is the son of Michelle Carter and Vince Carter Sr. His siblings are Alicia Scott and Chris Carter.

Vince Carter Wife

He married Ellen Rucker in July 2004 and they divorced in 2006. They have a daughter together.

Vince Carter Children | Kids

He has a daughter known as Kai Michelle Carter.

Vince Carter Rookie Year

Carter was initially drafted by the Golden State Warriors with the fifth overall pick in the 1998 NBA draft

Vince Carter Stats

Career statistics

Legend

  GP

Games played

  GS

Games started

 MPG

Minutes per game

 FG%

Field goal percentage

 3P%

3-point field goal percentage

 FT%

Free throw percentage

 RPG

Rebounds per game

 APG

Assists per game

 SPG

Steals per game

 BPG

Blocks per game

 PPG

Points per game

 Bold

Career high

NBA

Regular season

Year

Team

GP

GS

MPG

FG%

3P%

FT%

RPG

APG

SPG

BPG

PPG

2017–18

Sacramento

58

5

17.7

.403

.345

.757

2.6

1.2

.7

.4

5.4

2016–17

Memphis

73

15

24.6

.394

.378

.765

3.1

1.8

.8

.5

8.0

2015–16

Memphis

60

3

16.8

.388

.349

.833

2.4

.9

.6

.3

6.6

2014–15

Memphis

66

1

16.5

.333

.297

.789

2.0

1.2

.7

.2

5.8

2013–14

Dallas

81

0

24.4

.407

.394

.821

3.5

2.6

.8

.4

11.9

2012–13

Dallas

81

3

25.8

.435

.406

.816

4.1

2.4

.9

.5

13.4

2011–12

Dallas

61

40

25.3

.411

.361

.826

3.4

2.3

.9

.4

10.1

2010–11

Orlando

22

22

30.2

.470

.346

.747

4.1

2.9

.9

.1

15.1

2010–11

Phoenix

51

41

27.2

.422

.366

.735

3.6

1.6

.9

.3

13.5

2009–10

Orlando

75

74

30.8

.428

.367

.840

3.9

3.1

.7

.2

16.6

2008–09

New Jersey

80

80

36.8

.437

.385

.817

5.1

4.7

1.0

.5

20.8

2007–08

New Jersey

76

72

38.9

.456

.359

.816

6.0

5.1

1.2

.4

21.3

2006–07

New Jersey

82

82

38.1

.454

.357

.802

6.0

4.8

1.0

.4

25.2

2005–06

New Jersey

79

79

36.8

.430

.341

.799

5.8

4.3

1.2

.7

24.2

2004–05

Toronto

20

20

30.4

.411

.322

.694

3.3

3.1

1.3

.8

15.9

2004–05

New Jersey

57

56

38.9

.462

.425

.817

5.9

4.7

1.5

.6

27.5

2003–04

Toronto

73

73

38.2

.417

.383

.806

4.8

4.8

1.2

.9

22.5

2002–03

Toronto

43

42

34.2

.467

.344

.806

4.4

3.3

1.1

1.0

20.6

2001–02

Toronto

60

60

39.8

.428

.387

.798

5.2

4.0

1.6

.7

24.7

2000–01

Toronto

75

75

39.7

.460

.408

.765

5.5

3.9

1.5

1.1

27.6

1999–00

Toronto

82

82

38.1

.465

.403

.791

5.8

3.9

1.3

1.1

25.7

1998–99

Toronto

50

49

35.2

.450

.288

.761

5.7

3.0

1.1

1.5

18.3

Career

1,405

974

31.4

.437

.373

.799

4.5

3.3

1.0

.6

17.7

All-Star

7

5

18.0

.477

.375

.600

2.6

1.9

.9

.1

1

Vince Carter Net Worth

He has an estimated net worth of  $ 80 million.

Vince Carter Retire

Aug 24, 2018 – Entering his 21st NBA season, 41-year-old Carter, newly signed  a one year contract with the Hawk, still isn’t ready to retire.

Vince Carter Dunk Contest

Carter had ample opportunities to make an encore appearance while still in his prime, but feels another at this point of his career that would only take away from the legacy of his one and only dunk contest masterpiece.

Vince Carter Highlights

 

Vince Carter Best Dunks

Vince Carter Raptors

On February 7, 2019, against the Raptors, he passed Jerry West for 21st on the NBA’s all-time scoring list. On March 1, 2019, he logged the second-most minutes for the Hawks in a 168–161 quadruple-overtime loss to the Chicago Bulls. At 42, he became the oldest player in NBA history to play at least 45 minutes in a game. On March 4, he scored 21 points, all on 3-pointers, in a 114–113 loss to the Miami Heat. He thus surpassed Reggie Miller for 20th on the all-time scoring list, passed Jamal Crawford for sixth on the all-time 3-point field goals made list, became the oldest player to shoot seven 3-pointers, and broke his own record of being the oldest player to score 20+ points in a game at 42 years and 37 days old.

Vince Carter Championship

He joined the defending champion Dallas Mavericks in 2011 and the Memphis Grizzlies in 2014. In 2017, he signed with the Sacramento Kings. In 2018, he signed with the Hawks. Carter is an eight-time NBA All-Star.

Vince Carter Shoes | Jersey

Vince Carter shoes and Jersey

Vince Carter Facebook

Vince Carter Twitter

Vince Carter Instagram

Vince Carter Interview

Vince Carter Talks Transitioning to the NBA, Favorite Dunks And More

Source: slamonline.com

SLAM: Can you talk about your memories of draft day and what that whole experience was like for you?

VC: My memory of draft day was kind of up and down. I mean, you’re always thinking about, where am I gonna go? I hear what they’re saying, but I was a realist. I was like, I don’t want to hear the speculation. I don’t want to hear none of this. I just want to know. Then you start thinking about, OK, did I have a good workout? Who are the top 5 teams? Did I have a good workout in Denver? OK they’re at three. Because I knew I wasn’t going 1 or 2. It was either Mike Bibby or [Michael] Olowokandi. So it was like, Did I have a good workout in Denver? Yeah, I had a good workout there. Toronto? Eh, there was a lot going on. I don’t know if I played well enough. Come to find out I had a great workout for them, I just didn’t think I did. And then the fifth pick — Golden State — I had a good workout there, and down the line, in Dallas, I had one of my best workouts there where they cut it short. There and Sacramento, they cut the workout short because I had such a good workout and they were like, Oh you won’t be available [when we pick]. You leave those workouts like, OK, I feel good about some of them. And some of them you don’t.

And then you get to the day, the actual day. Now, it’s reality. Your dream is hours away and some of these guys have the fortune of knowing, I’m gonna be the number one pick. I’m gonna be the seventh pick. And some of the guys are just like, I don’t know. I’m on a sliding scale. Like myself, I knew I could go from 3, as high as 3, or as low as 8.  I just didn’t know, and I think that’s the kind of nerve-wrecking thing about the draft, and once you hear your name called, it’s like, Yes, finally [smiles].

SLAM: What was the range of emotions for you specifically, because you get drafted and then instantly find out about the trade? 

VC: Yeah, that’s what I was gonna say next. So it was like, Yes, finally it’s here. And you walk up, and you see it on TV all the time. You see the guys walking up the steps. You adjust your hat. You practice it all the time and then all of a sudden, David Stern says, ‘uh, yeah there’s about to be a trade.’ But you don’t know it’s going to be yourself so…

SLAM: Oh, so you had no idea? When he announced it that was the first time you heard about it?

VC: Yeah. So walking up, Antawn was at the bottom of the steps. He was trying to tell me, come to find out, he was trying to mouth it to me but I was on stage. There’s like cameras. David Stern has his hand out trying to shake my hand as I’m walking up and he’s talking to me. I was like [to Antawn], What, what? Never mind. Once I got [to him] to take pictures, he was like ‘Yo wait a second, he’s about to announce a trade.’  I was like, Damn, somebody getting traded [laughs]. So there you go.

SLAM: What was the biggest surprise for you, either on or off the court, when you made the jump to the NBA?

VC:  You’re on your own, obviously off the court. You have to learn how to prepare and do all that. But the biggest jump I think is you’re not playing against college kids. You’re not a junior or senior, and playing against freshmen, with a kid whose body is trying to develop or what not, or you’re playing against a senior who, he’s older but, he’s still not developed. You’re playing against grown men who’ve been around and the game is faster. Your position is a little different now, so you’re playing against a guy who might be two, three, sometimes four inches taller than you that weighs 30, 40 pounds more than you, and they have speed. They have, you know, mentioning LeBron is just a different beast but I’m talking about like, I remember coming in playing shooting guard, small forward sometimes. I’m playing against Scottie Pippen who’s 6-9. A 6-9 guy in college was a power forward, you know what I’m saying? So that was an adjustment.

Understanding these guys’ wingspan, the timing from getting the ball and getting the shot off against good defenders. All of that stuff mattered, and you had to learn how to get your shot off a lot quicker. Wasted motion is kind of the biggest thing that these guys are gonna have to understand…Now you’re playing against the next-level guys who, the wasted motion is what you have to get rid of, and who can get rid of it fastest is probably the guys who have the most success early, and then some of the others kind of learn that years later. So that was the biggest thing. I was fortunate to have some guys in my corner to kind of learn that lesson immediately, plus having a lockout season so I got to play with some of the NBA guys more, work with some of the coaches from Carolina that could prepare me.

SLAM: Is there a memory or highlight from your rookie season that stands out?

VC: I think dunking on Dikembe [Mutombo]. The Indiana dunk under the baseline, and of course the number one was probably winning Rookie of the Year. I know Mike Bibby was probably the hands-on favorite. I just had a great second part of the season where it was just between Paul Pierce and Jason Williams.

SLAM: What was the first thing you copped when you signed that NBA contract?

VC: The first thing I actually bought was, I started my foundation. That was the first thing I did before I even got a car. Part of my first year I still had the truck that I had in college, and then I got a Navigator which I still have today. I still drive it, a ’99 Lincoln Navigator silver. It’s still in my garage. I just drove it two days ago [laughs], and then my mom, [I got] my mom a car and a house. But the first thing was my foundation, which I still run right now.

SLAM: Last question, I gotta ask. Do you have a favorite dunk from your career, and could you walk me through it?

VC:  I’ll just do the most talked about. Favorite for me? It’s just too tough.  I’ll talk about the Alonzo Mourning dunk at Miami — that happened because in the first quarter I dunked on him and Richard Jefferson dunked on him. At halftime,  we’re sitting in the locker room, waiting for coach to come in and we were just talking like, Man you dunked on him, and oh man you dunked on him [too]. I said, There’s no way we’ll be able to dunk on Alonzo again, unless we take the hit. We gotta take the hit because he’s gonna try to knock us out. Because back then, you could knock guys down and it wasn’t, Oh let’s go look at the monitor to eject him. It wasn’t any of that. So I said, you’d have to take the hit and hopefully you’re high enough and you’re still able to dunk the ball. And that’s actually what happened.

Go up there, and I remember turning my body because I was like, Ah man he’s gonna hit me. And I could feel like, the momentum — the way he hit me just bumped me up higher in the air, so I was like, Oh man, the rim is right here. I see him go flying and I dunked the ball and I go down and I just tried to keep a straight face, like inside I was just like, Woah, this is crazy. I mean obviously the dunk was great and the bench was going crazy but, we literally, that was the exact scenario that we talked about at halftime, and it came to fruition and it was unreal.

SLAM: What was the first thing you copped when you signed that NBA contract?

VC: The first thing I actually bought was, I started my foundation. That was the first thing I did before I even got a car. Part of my first year I still had the truck that I had in college, and then I got a Navigator which I still have today. I still drive it, a ’99 Lincoln Navigator silver. It’s still in my garage. I just drove it two days ago [laughs], and then my mom, [I got] my mom a car and a house. But the first thing was my foundation, which I still run right now.

SLAM: Last question, I gotta ask. Do you have a favorite dunk from your career, and could you walk me through it?

VC:  I’ll just do the most talked about. Favorite for me? It’s just too tough.  I’ll talk about the Alonzo Mourning dunk at Miami — that happened because in the first quarter I dunked on him and Richard Jefferson dunked on him. At halftime,  we’re sitting in the locker room, waiting for coach to come in and we were just talking like, Man you dunked on him, and oh man you dunked on him [too]. I said, There’s no way we’ll be able to dunk on Alonzo again, unless we take the hit. We gotta take the hit because he’s gonna try to knock us out. Because back then, you could knock guys down and it wasn’t, Oh let’s go look at the monitor to eject him. It wasn’t any of that. So I said, you’d have to take the hit and hopefully you’re high enough and you’re still able to dunk the ball. And that’s actually what happened.

Go up there, and I remember turning my body because I was like, Ah man he’s gonna hit me. And I could feel like, the momentum — the way he hit me just bumped me up higher in the air, so I was like, Oh man, the rim is right here. I see him go flying and I dunked the ball and I go down and I just tried to keep a straight face, like inside I was just like, Woah, this is crazy. I mean obviously the dunk was great and the bench was going crazy but, we literally, that was the exact scenario that we talked about at halftime, and it came to fruition and it was unreal.

That and the dunk in Indiana. That’s the other one I always talk about just because, everybody was in awe of the dunk because I went under the basket and dunked it behind my head. But I did that out of fear that Dale Davis was gonna knock me out of the air. That’s why [I went to] the reverse, because I was going baseline and I’m going up and I see Dale take a step and, I don’t know that he’s gonna stop and let me dunk. I’m already in the air, so at that time I had already stopped and I’m looking at him. He’s coming so I was like, Oh shoot there’s the basket, and I dunked and just ran down the court. After the game he tells me, ‘Hey man, you know I could’ve…

SLAM: Knocked you out?

VC: Knocked you out was the clean version. But he said, ‘I like you man. You’re a good player, so I’ll let you live.‘ And all these years later we’re friends and we laugh about it.