Tracee Chimo Biography, Age, Net worth, Family, Education, Actress, Art critic

Tracee Chimo is an American stage and film actress, who became an art critic favorite after her 2012 breakout role as Daphna, the antagonist in Joshua Harmon’s dark comedy Bad Jews. She is known for her versatility, as is evidenced by her ability to transform her physical appearance to suit the needs of her character.

Tracee Chimo Biography

Tracee Chimo is an American stage and film actress, who became an art critic favorite after her 2012 breakout role as Daphna, the antagonist in Joshua Harmon’s dark comedy Bad Jews. She is known for her versatility, as is evidenced by her ability to transform her physical appearance to suit the needs of her character.

It has been suggested that her early training as a dancer contributed to Chimo’s understanding of how physical changes affect how others perceive a character, as well as how they evidence the individual’s inner life.

Tracee Chimo Age

Tracee Chimo was born in Saugus, Massachusetts, United States. Her age is still under review but we will update you very soon.

Tracee Chimo Net worth

Tracee Chimo earns her income from her businesses and other related organizations. She also earns her income from the Awards industry. She also earns her income from her work as a stage and film actress. She has an estimated net worth of $3 million dollars

Tracee Chimo Family

Tracee Chimo was born in Saugus, Massachusetts to Deborah and Bruce Chimo, in a small town just north of Boston, Massachusetts called Saugus. Her brother is Kevin Chimo. Her father was of Albanian descent and her mother was of Irish-Italian ancestry (her father is an Albanian Orthodox Christian, and her mother is Catholic). She resides with her family in Los Angeles and New York City.

Tracee Chimo Education

Tracee Chimo graduated from Saugus High School in Saugus, Massachusetts United States. She then attended Salem State University.

Tracee Chimo Actress

Tracee Chimo first came on the scene in 2009 when she originated the role of a shy, lovable, 16-year-old, mousy nerd named Lauren in Annie Baker’s ‘circle mirror transformation’.

Her “Chaplin-like” physical comedy, mixed with her ability to break your heart, garnered her much praise in the industry and she quickly became the show’s breakout star with the NY Times calling her, “a master of the comic-silent reaction.”

After a much-extended run at Playwrights Horizons, she went on to stun audiences and critics once again in Leslye Headland’s dark comedy, ‘Bachelorette’. Almost unrecognizable to audiences, Miss Chimo transformed herself into the character, Reagan.

A vicious, conniving, manipulative, drug addict who prowled the stage like a lioness about to pounce her prey. From there she shot her first film, Judd Apatow’s ‘The Five Year Engagement’, and spent some time living and working in Los Angeles, CA.

She wasn’t there long. Shortly after making the move from NY to LA, she was called to star opposite Jim Parsons and Jessica Hecht in Roundabout Theatre Company’s 2012 production of ‘Harvey’ on Broadway at Studio 54. Ms. Chimo was once again playing against type and very well received as the buoyantly love hungry Myrtle Mae Simmons.

‘Harvey’ closed its doors. She was cast as Daphna Feygenbaum, the antagonist in Roundabout’s wildly dark and funny new play ‘Bad Jews’. After her 4 month starring turn as this unapologetic and shockingly loyal traditionalist, she’s since gone on to shoot 3 more films and is currently shooting Season 2 of Netflix’s hit show ‘Orange is the New

Black’ in which she recurs as the earthy crunchy, Neri Feldman. She just wrapped filming on ‘The Good Wife’ and is currently rehearsing the remount of ‘Bad Jews’ which, due to its incredibly successful first run, has been transferred to the beautiful Laura Pels Theatre in New York City.

She’s the recent recipient of the 2013 Rising Star Award, and was nominated for Outer Critic’s Circle and Drama League Awards for her performance in ‘Bad Jews’. Other awards include the 2011 Clarence Derwent Award for ‘Most Promising Actress in New York’, a 2010 Drama Desk Award, OBIE Award, and two Lucille Lortel nominations in the ‘Best Actress’ category for her exquisitely unique work.

In 2010 she worked in Bachelorette and Circle Mirror Transformation was praised by Erik Piepenburg of The New York Times, who lauded Chimo for transforming herself into two characters so distinct from one another, commenting, “If, at the same time, you could meet the shy, expressionless Lauren, mumbling into the wall of her red hoodie, and the glittering, claws-extended  Regan, the meanest predator on the hunt, it would be hard to believe that they are the same person underneath.

And maybe they aren’t even if the actress Tracee Chimo channeled those characters to critical acclaim in two Off-Broadway plays this season.”Chimo’s performance in Mirror was also singled out by Elisabeth Vincentelli of the New York Post, who called her “a master of the comic silent reaction.”

In 2012, Charles Isherwood of The New York Times, who also noted Chimo’s performances in these two productions, called her work in the Broadway revival of Harvey “excellent”. Echoing other critic’s, Isherwood stated, “What’s most startling about this actress is her versatility: she seems to be almost physically transformed from performance to performance, so deeply does she burrow into her characters’ identities.

I didn’t recognize her at all, with her hair a frizzy nimbus of angry-looking dark curls and her face scrubbed free of makeup, in keeping with Daphna’s righteous self-seriousness.” nIn 2016 TBS premiered the TV comedy series People of Earth, on which Chimo plays Chelsea Healey.

Tracee Chimo Art critic

Chimo became an art critic favorite after her 2012 breakout role as Daphna, the antagonist in Joshua Harmon’s dark comedy Bad Jews. She is known for her versatility, as is evidenced by her ability to transform her physical appearance to suit the needs of her character. It has been suggested that her early training as a dancer contributed to Chimo’s understanding of how physical changes affect how others perceive a character, as well as how they evidence the individual’s inner life.

Tracee Chimo Twitter