Mike Pereira Biography

Mike Pereira is a former American football official and later Vice President of Officiating for the National Football League (NFL). Since 2010, he has served as a rules analyst for Fox Sports. He is of Portuguese descent.

Mike Pereira Age

Mike Pereira was born on April 13, 1950, in Stockton, California, United States. He is 69 years old as of 2019.

Mike Pereira Net worth

Mike Pereira earns his income from his businesses and other related organizations. He also earns his income from his work as an American football official and former Vice President. He also earns his income from other sources. He has an estimated net worth of $ 4 million dollars.

Mike Pereira Education

Mike Pereira graduated from Santa Clara University in 1972 with a degree in Finance. Pereira lives in Sacramento with his wife Gail. Pereira commutes to the Fox Sports studios in Los Angeles each weekend during the football season.

Mike Pereira Wife

Mike Pereira married Gail Pereira. He resides in Stockton, California, the United States with his family.

Mike Pereira Photo

Mike Pereira Officiating career

Pereira has been involved in football since 1982 when he was an NCAA Division I official. He spent 14 years officiating college football, beginning with nine years in the Big West Conference (1982-91), followed by five years in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) (1992-96). During that time, he officiated eight postseason Bowl Games, including the Aloha Bowl and Cotton Bowl (twice each), Citrus Bowl, Gator Bowl, Holiday Bowl, and Freedom Bowl.

Pereira made the jump to the NFL as a sideline judge in 1996 while also holding the title of supervisor of officials for the WAC. After two years patrolling the NFL sidelines and overseeing WAC officiating, Pereira was promoted to NFL Supervisor of Officiating in 1998. In 2001, he became Director of Officiating for the NFL and then was promoted to Vice President of NFL Officiating in 2004.

Mike Pereira Before working in the NFL, Pereira spent 14 years officiating college football games, with nine years in the Big West Conference (1982–90) followed by five years in the Western Athletic Conference (1991–95).

Pereira moved up to the NFL for two seasons (1996 and 1997) as a side judge on the officiating crew headed by referee Mike Carey. He wore uniform number 77, later worn by three-time Super Bowl referee Terry McAulay. While working for the NFL, Pereira served as supervisor of officials for the Western Athletic Conference.

In 1998, Pereira was promoted to NFL supervisor of officiating. In 2001 Pereira became Director of Officiating for the NFL, succeeding Jerry Seeman, and then was promoted to Vice President of Officiating in 2004. Pereira retired from the NFL after the 2009 season. He is heavily involved in Battlefields to Ballfields, a charitable organization dedicated to retiring or returning veterans that aspire to become sports referees.

From February to June 2011, Pereira was the Pac-10’s interim coordinator of officiating, charged with implementing changes in the conference’s officiating program. His successor, Tony Corrente, retained Pereira on his staff as a consultant through the Pac-12’s 2011–12 football season. Pereira was an officiating consultant for the Alliance of American Football, which began play in February 2019 and ended in April of the same year.

Mike Pereira Fox sports

Mike Pereira is a former Vice President of Officiating (formerly Senior Director of Officiating) for the National Football League (NFL). He first took over the position in 2001, succeeding Jerry Seeman. He was also a game official in the NFL for two seasons (1996 and 1997) as a side judge on the officiating crew headed by referee Mike Carey.

He wore uniform number 77, which is now worn by side judge-turned-three-time Super Bowl referee Terry McAulay.Pereira appeared on the NFL Network show, NFL Total Access, during the “Official Review” segment, to discuss key calls made during the previous week’s games with host Rich Eisen every Wednesday during the season.

In a Conference Championship edition of “Official Review” on January 21, 2009, Pereira confirmed that he would be retiring from the position of Vice President of Officiating after the 2009 season. In June 2010, it was announced that Pereira would be joining Fox Sports to serve as a rules analyst for the network’s college and NFL coverage.

He began a column on FoxSports.com and started to provide commentary during Fox Sports football telecasts. In 2012, Sports Illustrated named Pereria as one of the NFL’s most indispensable broadcasting talents, saying that “Viewers have longed for broadcasters to provide accurate explanations from the NFL’s byzantine rule book, and Pereira, thankfully, has taken the burden off ex-jocks and announcers”.

Michael Hiestand of USA Today wrote that “after Fox’s groundbreaking move to put the ex-NFL vice president of officiating on-air, Pereira proved to be a candid voice not a shill for the almighty NFL”. However, Danny O’Neil of the Seattle Times wrote that “Pereira has assumed the role of the overzealous defense attorney his appearances generally conclude with him concluding that the referees have gotten it right yet again.

An analyst is a title that FOX hangs on Pereira, but advocate is more appropriate”.Pereira also sparked coverage by others in the media when he criticized the commentary of Monday Night Football announcer Jon Gruden, calling him out as a “blowhard who spouts off when he doesn’t know what he’s talking about”.

Pereira specifically felt that Gruden “butchered” the analysis of two defenseless receiver plays during the telecast of an Atlanta Falcons-New Orleans Saints game. However, Doug Farrar of Yahoo! Sports thought that Pereira should have instead taken the higher road, and Fox should “lay down the law to Pereira [and] needs to be told to put the agendas away”.

From February to June 2011, Pereira was the Pac-10’s interim coordinator of officiating, charged with implementing changes in the conference’s officiating program. Current Pac-12 coordinator of officiating Tony Corrente retained Pereira on his staff as a consultant through the Pac-12’s 2011-2012 football season.

Mike Pereira Media career

Mike Pereira As VP of Officiating, Pereira appeared on the NFL Network show NFL Total Access during the “Official Review” segment, to discuss key calls made during the previous week’s games with host Rich Eisen every Wednesday during the season.

In June 2010, it was announced that Pereira would be joining Fox Sports to serve as a rules analyst for the network’s college and NFL coverage. He began a column on FoxSports.com and started to provide commentary during Fox Sports football telecasts.

During Week 1 of the 2010 NFL season, Pereira correctly predicted that referee Gene Steratore would rule what appeared to be a game-winning catch by Calvin Johnson as incomplete. “That was my first real time of being put on the spot”, Pereira would later say.

“I was worried to death that the referee was going to say it’s a touchdown and I’d be out of a job in one week… It validated my role as to be able to go on and explain things so people could understand why a decision was made on the field. Then at that point on, I got more air time.” He is also a frequent guest on KNBR during football season.

In 2012, Sports Illustrated named Pereira as one of the NFL’s most indispensable broadcasting talents, saying, “Viewers have longed for broadcasters to provide accurate explanations from the NFL’s byzantine rule book, and Pereira, thankfully, has taken the burden off ex-jocks and announcers”.

Michael Hiestand of USA Today wrote that “after Fox’s groundbreaking move to put the ex-NFL vice president of officiating on-air, Pereira proved to be a candid voice not a shill for the almighty NFL”. However, Danny O’Neil of the Seattle Times wrote that

“Pereira has assumed the role of the overzealous defense attorney … his appearances generally conclude with him concluding that the referees have gotten it right yet again … The analyst is the title that FOX hangs on Pereira, but advocate is more appropriate”.

Pereira also sparked coverage by others in the media when he criticized the commentary of Monday Night Football announcer Jon Gruden, calling him out as a “blowhard … who spouts off when he doesn’t know what he’s talking about”.

He specifically felt that Gruden “butchered” the analysis of two defenseless receiver plays during the telecast of an Atlanta Falcons-New Orleans Saints game. However, Doug Farrar of Yahoo! Sports thought that Pereira should have instead taken the higher road, and Fox should “lay down the law to Pereira [and] needs to be told to put the agendas away”. Pereira’s success led Fox in 2015 to adopt rules analysts for three other Fox properties Andy Petree (NASCAR, replaced by Larry McReynolds in 2016), David Fay (golf), and Joe Machnik (FIFA).

Mike Pereira NFL Referee

Pereira, who rose through the ranks to become the National Football League’s vice president of officiating before going into the TV business, is the driving force behind Battlefields to Ballfields, which recruits military veterans to work youth and scholastic contests as referees and umpires. It’s hard to argue with the line of thinking that spawned the program.

Men and women exiting military service may be somewhat less likely to have started families already or thus far immersed themselves in careers, giving them more discretionary time to participate. “The big thing I tell people is that if there are no umpires for the Little League baseball game, there eventually won’t be any Little League,” said Dansville resident Jim DeBell Jr., a former NFL game official who is now mentoring Battlefields to Ballfields recruits.

Pereira wants to remove as many obstacles as possible for the initiative’s participants. Money brought in through donations and fundraisers such as the annual Battlefields to Ballfields golf tournament next month at Cobblestone Creek in Victor gets distributed to the more than 200 veterans recruited thus far. These scholarships are intended to cover all of an official’s costs for the first three years.

The training course, uniforms, equipment, organization dues and mandatory fingerprinting can run $500 or more in some sports. Without the scholarship, a first-year football official who only picks up half a dozen junior varsity games while getting his feet wet would lose money. DeBell says he was in that boat even as he worked arena football games in his 25-year journey to reach the NFL.

“I don’t want them to have paid a dime out of their pocket to get there,” Pereira said. “So their first check that they get goes into their pocket. It doesn’t go somewhere else and we do it for a period of three years. Just like they gave us years when they were in the service, we’re making a commitment to them for three full years. … I want to support the veterans both emotionally and economically.”

Three years is not a span of time pulled out of thin air. Pereira, widely known now by the public in his groundbreaking role as Fox’s football rules analyst, knows that an official who hangs in there for that long is all but certain to make it to the 10-year mark and beyond. DeBell has been mentoring 15 Battlefields to Ballfields recruits mostly in the Buffalo and Rochester areas he’s also seeking candidates from the Southern Tier and says he hasn’t lost any of them so far.

Said Pereira: “Three years of doing something that most people don’t have the courage to do will align you with people that become your best friends, people that go through the same frustrations. In three years of doing that, you will make lifetime friends.” Three years also happens to be the length of time Battlefields to Ballfields has been in place.

It hasn’t been long enough to secure big corporate money, but the program has caught the attention of pro leagues and college conferences, whose executives are well aware that their farm system for new officials has been drying up in the past decade. Pereira is confident that he’ll have data this summer proving to them that Battlefields to Ballfields works and can be scaled up with more funding.

“We want to be clearly established when we go to the pro leagues,” he said. At lower levels, the National Federation of State High School Associations and some of its member organizations have also begun to take notice. The New Mexico Activities Association announced last June that it was becoming the first state scholastic organization partnering with Battlefields to Ballfields.

Mike Pereira Other work

On February of 2017, Pereira launched “BATTLEFIELDS TO BALLFIELDS,” his foundation that provides scholarships to veterans of the United States Armed Forces. The goal of the foundation is to provide veterans with an opportunity to get integrated back into their community through officiating.

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