Mary Kate Burgess Bio, Age, Family, Education, KTUU, Twitter, News

Mary Kate Burgess Biography

Mary Kate Burgess is an American Weekend Sports Anchor/Multimedia Journalist at the KTUU-TV. She joined the Channel 2 News team in December 2017, as a Sports Anchor/Multimedia Journalist. M.K.’s love of sports began at an early age and was further solidified while watching college football, especially the Florida Gators, with her dad.

Mary Kate Burgess Age

Her age has not yet been updated.

Mary Kate Burgess Family

Born in Virginia, M.K. grew up in New Jersey, Texas, and Missouri. Always willing to take on new challenges, M.K. says she’s excited to broaden her horizons and have a chance to cover sports like mushing and the Iron Dog – opportunities that are far less common in the Lower 48 states.

Mary Kate Burgess Education

Kate graduated from the University of Missouri in 2015, with a bachelor’s degree in Radio/TV Journalism.

                                                  Mary Kate Burgess

Mary Kate Burgess Career

Kate, or M.K., joined the Channel 2 News team in December 2017, as a Sports Anchor/Multimedia Journalist together with fellow reporter Howie Gordon. M.K.’s love of sports began at an early age and was further solidified while watching college football, especially the Florida Gators, with her dad.
That passion led to many athletic endeavors during her high school and collegiate years. While in high school, M.K. ran track, played basketball, tennis, and lacrosse. She competed in club lacrosse while in college, and she began running half marathons just over a year ago. She’s looking forward to running her next half marathon in Anchorage.

Mary Kate Burgess KTUU

Burgess is an American Weekend Sports Anchor/Multimedia Journalist at the KTUU-TV.

Mary Kate Burgess Twitter

Mary Kate Burgess News

Published: Thu 8:48 AM, Mar 21, 2019

Source: www.ktuu.com

Austin, Texas (KTUU) Alaska’s Allie Ostrander became the first woman ever to win the 3,000-meter steeplechase national championship three times in a row at the NCAA Div. 1 National Championships in Austin Texas on Saturday. Originally an alumna from Kenai Central High School, Ostrander finished the event in 9:37.73, and completed her three-peat in dominant fashion. The red-shirt junior from Boise State impressed on a national stage just a few days earlier, breaking her own record from 2018 in the semifinals on Thursday. She still has to run the 5000-meter race later on Saturday.

Heartbreak for cyclist fans of the Fireweed 400. The long-distance bicycle race announced on its Facebook page and website there isn’t going to be a 2019 race and that there won’t be any more future races. In the post, organizers say that the race planning committee studied the information available and determined that it would be too difficult to try and put together a 2019 race. This also means any future races are not possible.

The 2018 event is the final chapter of the Fireweed 400. Organizers on the race’s Facebook page extended their apologies to racers who were awaiting the registration for the 2019 event. The Fireweed 400 started back in 2002. It operated as a non-profit organization whose main goal was to support youth athletics across Alaska. The race would have taken place on July 13th and 14th.

It’s a homecoming of sorts. For the first time since scratching at Shaktoolik in the 2019 Iditarod, Nicolas Petit returned to Girdwood Wednesday, where members of the community were waiting to welcome him back. In the cozy taproom of Girdwood Brewing Company, Petit was welcomed back by dozens of people with open arms. “Home sweet home,” he said with a sad smile. “Didn’t make it to Nome.”

The Girdwood musher had the lead for most of the grueling race before his dog team refused to run anymore, sitting on the ice just 14 miles outside of Shaktoolik. But according to Petit, he’s not giving up, and instead is planning to take them right back to the coast and train with them so they aren’t afraid of that part of Alaska. “Belly rubs across the sea ice is kind of what I’ve been saying,” Petit said with a chuckle. “Outside of a race context and even more energy than we had that day, which we had lots, so we’ll be fine. We’ll go across there and probably only the dogs that went this last time.”

KTUU asked if he was happy about getting to spend more time out in Unalakleet with his dogs after everything that happened. “I’m excited to get to teach them a valuable lesson,” he said quietly. “They need to learn this place isn’t always going to blow, and we’ll make it through and we won’t be feeling lost like last year,” referring to the 2018 Iditarod when Petit again had and lost the lead during a ground blizzard on the coast. He ended up finishing second to Joar Leifseth Ulsom after finally finding the trail.

In the end, Petit says the biggest thing he’s learned is that the memory of his dogs is just as important as their physical health. “More than ever, I know that their mental well being is that I’m happy this second. They have a very, very good memory and you have to take that into consideration when you do anything with anybody,” he said. “They’re a dog team, not a snow machine. Just because there’s nothing physically there, there might be something mentally there. I know that the way it went until that, was the epitome of a magic carpet ride.” Next up for Nic and his team is training for the Kobuk 440 and then back out to Unalakleet to conquer the part of the race that has troubled them for the past two years.

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