Evan Koslof Biography, Age, Career, WUSA9, Twitter And Facebook

Evan Koslof is an American journalist working as a reporter for WUSA9. He graduated in 2013 from the George Washington University with a degree in Journalism.

Evan Koslof Biography

Evan Koslof is an American journalist working as a reporter for WUSA9. He graduated in 2013 from the George Washington University with a degree in Journalism. He fell in love with D.C and even after graduating, he was thrilled to know he was returning to D.C to work for WUSA.

Evan Koslof Age

Information about his age will be updated soon.

Evan Koslof Career | Evan Koslof WUSA9

Evan took a job at the beach after he graduated to work as the Sussex County Chief for WBOC News situated on the Delaware coast.

He built his reputation while he was working here because of following hard news, doing countless stories on the politics of the area.

Evan Koslof

Evan did many stories with the Spanish community in Delaware because he is fluent in Spanish. He received a regional AP award for Best Reporter back in 2015.

In 2016, he traveled to Rio for the Olympic games. He sent back news for WBOC News yet he had gone there for leisure. He returned to D.C in 2016 as a reporter for WUSA9. He works on any topic he lays his hands on.

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Walking with dad! Beautiful day out here.

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Digital Snow Days with Evan Koslof – Wednesday, February 4, 2015

 Article by Evan Koslof

Could a monorail be the answer for I-270? One Montgomery County developer thinks so

Source; wusa9.com

Like many in the region, Montgomery County developer Bob Eisinger has become accustomed to long waits on I-270. Unlike many though, he’s made it his mission to try and fix the problem. His solution is new: a monorail.

Even at 10 a.m. – hours after rush hour – Bob Eisinger had warnings about Interstate 270.

“If we’re going to 270,” he said, pointing at his car’s GPS. “We’ll get nailed… There’s a lot of red on there.”

Like many in the region, Eisinger has become accustomed to long waits on the highway. Unlike many though, he’s made it his mission to try and fix the problem.

“We need to start fixing the problems we create,” he said. “And not use the same technology we used to create them with.”

Although out of the box, the idea is not some half-baked proposition. Eisinger has poured tens-of-thousands of dollars into the proposal and has gained some powerful allies in the business community and political sphere.

He created “The High Road Foundation,” and has partnered with transportation companies like Bombardier and BYD, engineering firms like Innova Technologies, and construction companies like Granite Construction and Clark Construction.

His idea has been generally accepted by mayors across the region and has intrigued state senators. The proposal has even earned him a sit-down with the transportation secretary of the state on June 4.

“We’re feeling good about this,” he said.

The monorail would run in between Frederick and Shady Grove, a 27-mile journey, that would be traversed in just 31 minutes, according to Eisinger. Along the way, there would be stops at Urbana, Comsat, Germantown, and Metropolitan Grove.

The project would cost $3.4 billion to construct, an amount Eisinger said is far lower than it would be to expand the Red Line from Shady Grove.

“There’s much more bang for your buck,” he said. “And it’s cheaper at the same time.”

The monorail would attract 45,000 trips per day, according to a ridership study done by the foundation. Eisinger said he believes the fares would be more than enough to cover operating costs, making this a viable, self-sustainable system.

A monorail would also require “basically zero” land acquisition since they can be built along medians of the highway. This is in contrast to any plan for road expansion, which would eat up some private property.

There are examples of monorail systems across the globe, from Osaka Japan to Sao Paulo, Brazil. And these systems can be massive. In Chongqing China, they have about 1 million trips per day.

But in the U.S., development has been slow, outside of small systems in places like Las Vegas and Seattle.

Eisinger said there’s a clear reason that it’s been overlooked.

“It’s because of the Simpsons cartoon,” he said.

He’s referring to the classic 1993 episode of the Simpsons, in which a conman came to town selling the townsfolk on a monorail, that would turn out to be a bust.

“It’s just been overlooked as a viable transportation mode,” he said. “It hasn’t been overlooked internationally. It’s being built everywhere.”