Chris Nguyen Biography, Age, Image, Wife, Facebook, Twitter

Chris Nguyen is a News Anchor and Reporter at Disney/ABC Television Group. many years ago, I laced up my first pair of hockey skates at the old Eastridge Ice Arena in San Jose. My family wanted to get out of the summer heat, and as a result, the mall became our go-to place to escape.

Chris Nguyen (Reporter) Biography

Chris Nguyen is a News Anchor and Reporter at Disney/ABC Television Group. many years ago, I laced up my first pair of hockey skates at the old Eastridge Ice Arena in San Jose. My family wanted to get out of the summer heat, and as a result, the mall became our go-to place to escape. The ice hockey career was short-lived, but my love for the Bay Area never went away. I’m honored to be sharing the stories that matter most to our community, and even more thrilled to be doing it in a place I’ve long considered my second home.

As the first-born son of Vietnamese American immigrants, I was raised in Western Washington but spent a lot of time with relatives down in the South Bay. I’m a proud graduate of the University of Washington, where I studied communication and political science. With that said, I hope you’ll forgive me in advance for my allegiance to the Seattle Seahawks.

Whether it’s meeting with Super Bowl MVP’s or everyday superstars, I love connecting with people from all walks of life. On a professional note, I got my first on-air break as an anchor/reporter at WAND-TV (NBC) in Central Illinois.

From there, it was back to my home state where I served the viewers of the Inland Northwest as an anchor/reporter for KREM-TV (CBS). Prior to joining the ABC7 News team, I worked as a weekend morning anchor and general assignment reporter at KXTV, the ABC affiliate in Sacramento.

My family and friends mean the world to me, and I’m grateful that they’ve been supportive of my career throughout the years. Outside of the newsroom, I enjoy trying out new restaurants, and as a result, can often be found at the gym burning off those extra calories! I’ve completed a handful of half marathons, and have my sights set on completing a full course in the near future.

Let’s stay connected on Twitter or Facebook. I’d love to get your feedback, and look forward to seeing you the next time I’m in your neighborhood!

Chris reports weekdays from the ABC7 South Bay bureau and anchors ABC7 Morning News on Saturdays.

Chris Nguyen (Reporter) Age

Chris Nguyen serves as the SVP Product of Bleacher Report. Chris started at Bleacher Report in October of 2011. Chris currently resides in the San Francisco Bay Area. His pieces of information about a Birth date is unknown but stay ready for the update soon

How the Bleacher Report is using Instagram Stories for app downloads

Bleacher Report knows that people share its content to Instagram, and now the Turner-owned sports publisher is trying to take advantage of that behavior to get people to install its mobile app.

Bleacher Report has updated its mobile app so that people can share content from the app to Instagram Stories. When people view an Instagram Story featuring content shared from Bleacher Report’s app, they will be able to tap the post either to install Bleacher Report’s app through their phone’s app store or to open the app if it’s already been installed.

The publisher is taking advantage of functionality that Instagram introduced in May 2018 but has only extended to certain companies, such as Netflix and Spotify.

Seven years after its launch, Bleacher Report’s mobile app is “our flagship. It’s the best experience of B/R that we want you to have,” said Chris Nguyen, svp of product at Bleacher Report. The app accounts for a large percentage of Bleacher Report’s owned-and-operated audience as well as its owned-and-operated revenue, he said.

According to Comscore, 4.8 million people in the U.S. used Bleacher Report’s mobile app in March 2019, up from 3.7 million in March 2018. Despite that growth, the app’s monthly user base remains a fraction of the 19.9 million people that used ESPN’s app in March 2019.

That suggests that Bleacher Report could do a better job of communicating to people why they might want to use its app, which is where the Instagram Stories feature comes into play.

One of the main reasons people use Bleacher Report’s app is to get customizable push notifications on breaking news involving their favorite sports or teams.

These push notifications can provide a form of social currency if someone finds out about a blockbuster trade before any of their friends, which is why Bleacher Report has seen a lot of people screenshot its push notifications and share them to Instagram. “We know the No. 1 trigger in the app that drives sharing is the alerts,” said Nguyen.

However, the potential audience boost from that form of sharing was a black box to the Bleacher Report. “We actually had no way of understanding what they do when it’s screenshot and shared. This is a different way of tapping that behavior,” he said.

When people share a post from Bleacher Report’s app to Instagram Stories, a thumbnail of the post will appear in the story, including its title, main image, how long ago it was published, how many comments it has received and how many people have liked the post in the app. Atop the post will appear the caption “Open in Bleacher Report” that people can tap on to install or open the app.

Bleacher Report’s hope is that people will see a breaking news post that a friend shared from its app to their Instagram Story, be bummed that they weren’t the first to know and opt to install the app in order to be the one to scoop their friends in the future.

That is why the publisher introduced the feature on April 25 to coincide with the NFL Draft and all the alerts it would be sending out regarding which players each team drafted and any trades that may occur during the draft.

While the feature has been available for a couple of weeks, Nguyen said it was too early to share any stats regarding the number of app installs and app opens driven by the Instagram Stories feature so far.

Bleacher Report is not directly making money from the Instagram Story sharing feature. Instead, the idea is that the feature will grow the app’s user base, thereby giving the Bleacher Report more opportunities to serve ads within the app.

The Instagram Story feature could help to grow the app’s registered user base. People don’t have to sign up for a Bleacher Report in order to use the app, but they do if they want to comment or like posts in the app.

Since Instagram is a social platform, it’s possible that the people who install the app from Instagram may be more likely to sign up for Bleacher Report accounts in order to take advantage of the app’s social features. If they do, then that will make it easier for Bleacher Report to personalize the content and ads that it shows those people across its owned-and-operated properties.

Bleacher Report is able to track which content people are sharing from its app to Instagram Stories as well as what content shared on Instagram Stories leads people to install or open the app. However, it’s being careful with how it interprets and applies that data to the content it produces and the alerts that it triggers.

“It’s not necessarily ‘this is the stuff that gets shared most, let’s go create more of that.’ It’s more than we want to make our experiences as optimized as possible for sharing,” said Nguyen.

Chris Nguyen (Reporter) Image

Chris Nguyen (Reporter) Photo

Chris Nguyen (Reporter) Wife

Chris Nguyen is a News Anchor and Reporter at Disney/ABC Television Group. many years ago, I laced up my first pair of hockey skates at the old Eastridge Ice Arena in San Jose. My family wanted to get out of the summer heat, and as a result, the mall became our go-to place to escape.

The ice hockey career was short-lived, but my love for the Bay Area never went away. I’m honored to be sharing the stories that matter most to our community, and even more thrilled to be doing it in a place I’ve long considered my second home. His pieces of information about Marriages is unknown for now but ready for the update soon

Bleacher Report gets people to spend 5 minutes on its app each day

Speed tweaks and a new look help Bleacher Report keep users glued to its app.

To speed up load times, over the past year Bleacher Report started natively uploading tweets, GIFs and Instagram posts within its app, rather than pulling them from the mobile web.

For now, Bleacher Report’s articles still load from the mobile web, but the publisher is looking into adopting Google AMP for its in-app articles to get another speed boost. In April, the sports publisher also launched its own mobile video player and redesigned its app to include tabs and focus more on national sports coverage.

Bleacher Report users, on average, spent 151 minutes in its app per month this past year, according to comScore data. This was the highest among major sports publishers, as the top five sports apps in terms of time spent (excluding Bleacher Report) averaged 82 minutes per user per month.

“The redesign was the last piece of a lot of ‘under the hood’ work that we’ve done,” said Chris Nguyen, Bleacher Report’s VP of product. “We’ve invested our energy to make sure we can control the [mobile] experience.”

Bleacher Report is investing in mobile video product at a time when both mobile and video are rapidly growing. With mobile eating digital media, speed has become increasingly important in keeping users’ attention, which has led many publishers to adopt fast-loading features like Facebook Instant Articles and Google AMP.

To boost speed and reduce vendor costs, Bleacher Report replaced video vendors Ooyala and Akamai with its own mobile video player.

Since the redesign, Bleacher Report’s in-app videos load within 1.2 seconds, on average, on both Android and iOS, according to video analytics firm Conviva. Per Conviva, the median video load time for publishers is 5.6 seconds on Android and 4.2 seconds on iOS. Bleacher Report declined to provide year-over-year statistics since it switched analytics vendors with the redesign.

The video player has been frequently used since the redesign. One-third of the app’s users use one of the app’s new tabs, Fire, which features silent autoplay videos on a loop, similar to the now-defunct Vine.

Users who visit Fire stay in the app for 24 percent longer than non-Fire users, said Nguyen, who declined to share raw numbers. In its first month, users watched 150 million video loops on Fire, which lets people quickly scroll through the top sports highlights throughout the nation. Most of the app’s other features focus predominantly on the user’s selected favorite teams.

“We view every tab like it is its own app within the app,” Nguyen said. “We wanted to create an addictive habit around something that isn’t your team.”

About 3 million people use Bleacher Report’s app each month, according to comScore, which means that it still has a long way to go before it catches up with ESPN’s app audience of more than 13 million monthly visitors.

“We might not have as large of breadth,” Nguyen said. “But our engagement is really strong.”

Chris Nguyen (Reporter) Facebook

Chris Nguyen (Reporter) Twitter